See a second ad in this series, "Are they hard to put in?"
See a very early Tampax ad (1936) - a very early Tampax box and contents - more early commercial tampons
See more Tampax items: American ad from August 1965 - nudity in an ad: May 1992 (United Kingdom) - a sign advertising Tampax during World War II - the original patent - an instruction sheet from the 1930s
The influential Dickinson Report (1945) - Early commercial tampons
Ad Aug 1965 - actress Susan Dey ad, 1970 - gymnast Mary Lou Retton ad, 1986 - ad "Are you sure I'll still be a virgin?" Feb. 1990 - ad (British, nude) 1992 - Tampax sign (World War II) - ad, British, 1994 (the thong advantage)
Australian douche ad (ca. 1900) - Fresca douche (date ?) - Kotique douche 1974 ad - Liasan (1) ad - Liasan (2) ad - Lysol 1928 ad - Lysol 1948 ad - Marvel 1926 ad - Midol 1938 ad - Midol 1959 booklet - o.b. German (papyrus tampons) - Pristeen 1969 ad - o.b. German (nude) - Sterizol 1926 ad - Vionell spray 1970 ad (Germany) - the odor page

A British Tampax ad using nudity (1992) - And see other ads directed at teenagers.

See a Modess True or False? ad in The American Girl magazine, January 1947, and actress Carol Lynley in "How Shall I Tell My Daughter" booklet ad (1955) - Modess . . . . because ads (many dates).
CONTRIBUTE to Humor, Words and expressions about menstruation and Would you stop menstruating if you could?
No, the tampon can't lostSome MUM site links:
homepage | MUM address & What does MUM mean? | e-mail the museum | privacy on this site | who runs this museum?? |
Amazing women! | the art of menstruation | artists (non-menstrual) | asbestos | belts | bidets | founder bio | Bly, Nellie | MUM board | books: menstruation and menopause (and reviews) | cats | company booklets for girls (mostly) directory | contraception and religion | costumes | menstrual cups | cup usage | dispensers | douches, pain, sprays | essay directory | extraction | facts-of-life booklets for girls | famous women in menstrual hygiene ads | FAQ | founder/director biography | gynecological topics by Dr. Soucasaux | humor | huts | links | masturbation | media coverage of MUM | menarche booklets for girls and parents | miscellaneous | museum future | Norwegian menstruation exhibit | odor | olor | pad directory | patent medicine | poetry directory | products, current | puberty booklets for girls and parents | religion | Religión y menstruación | your remedies for menstrual discomfort | menstrual products safety | science | Seguridad de productos para la menstruación | shame | slapping, menstrual | sponges | synchrony | tampon directory | early tampons | teen ads directory | tour of the former museum (video) | underpants & panties directory | videos, films directory | Words and expressions about menstruation | Would you stop menstruating if you could? | What did women do about menstruation in the past? | washable pads
Leer la versión en español de los siguientes temas: Anticoncepción y religión, Breve reseña - Olor - Religión y menstruación - Seguridad de productos para la menstruación.

See the original Museum of Menstruation, a cartoon visit,
the museum's future, and reaction to it and this site.

Some thoughts on "You want me to put that ... where?"
Tampax ad, 
October 1997, Teen magazine, U.S.A.
With a helpful etching by Augustin Hirschvogel (who??)

Well, Donald Trump – and now even proper ladies – feel permitted to say a word in public that would have landed them outside of mainstream American society, what, a month before the 2016 election?

To answer the question in the ad's title: that word is – gosh, am I allowed to use Trump's word here, a place sacred to that body part? Google kicked this museum out of its ad program probably because of similar although correct language.

Let me tell you a story. You're the first to hear this.
Around 2000 a university invited me to display items from this museum in a student feminist event in the Spring. Some of the other participants called me over to a table to join them in coloring with crayons a body part close to the one we're talking about. It was illustrated on sheets of paper.

"Sit down. We're coloring vaginas," said the hostess as she handed me a sheet and crayons.

I stared at a line drawing of a large vulva. My several female companions, in their teens and 20s it looked to me, were talking among themselves and coloring.

As a geek with special social skills, some would say limited, even clueless, I hesitated at this invitation to agree to a misnomer.

Trying to be polite, I cleared my throat – these were actual owners of that body part, after all, and they were very nice to allow me to color it in their company – and said what had to be said.

"That's not a vagina. It's a vulva," I mansplained, forcing a smile. It hurt.

The chattering stopped. No one looked at me. As frosty a silence as I've ever felt paralyzed my environs.

Embarrassed, I left.

But sometimes even an old white man can splain the truth.

Unfortunately "pussy," Trump's word, would have been closer to the mark for everyone.

  • By the way, if you need an illustration of what "grabbing pussy" is–that's what the president said he did more than once–see what the German artist, mathematician, cartographer Augustin Hirschvogel (16th century) etched below the ad.
Anyway, Tampax from the beginning felt compelled to teach its potential consumers why those little wads of material, "small wonders," were just the thing to absorb menstrual discharge. It was and is often a tough sell.
See similar Tampax ads: "Are they hard to put in?" and "I hate pads - they're like wearing diapers."
See a letter a mother wrote to her daughter's doctor about tampons and hymens.
Below: The ad measures 8 x 10 3/4" (20.3 x 27.3 cm).
Below: About five hundred years ago German artist Augustin Hirschvogel, also a scientist, mathematician and cartographer, etched this satyr grabbing a woman's, um, whatever (Wikipedia), the president's bragging about which having been in the news right before his inauguration. Remember the pussy hats? Demonstrations? Amazing what's caught in the Web.
See another Tampax instructional ad: "No, the tampon can't get lost. All you can lose is those diapers."

And another: "Are they hard to put in?" - American ad from August 1965 - nudity in an ad: May 1992 (United Kingdom) -
a sign advertising Tampax
during World War II - the original patent - an instruction sheet from the 1930s

© 2016 Harry Finley. It is illegal to reproduce or distribute any of the work on this Web site in any manner or medium
without written permission of the author. Please report suspected violations to hfinley@mum.org