New this week: Constipation relief at last, or . . . ?: Dr. Young's rectal dilators (U.S.A., 1900-1940?) - humor

Would you stop menstruating if you could? (New entries)
Words and expressions for menstruation (Two new entries, America: "Closed . . . " and "Visit . . .")
What did European and American women use for menstruation in the past?

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MUM "debate" airs Friday, 17 November (2000) on Warner Brothers television

Producer Dan Holten called me to say that the episode of Moral Court on which I appear, the television program on which I almost had a debate about this museum, shows this coming Friday. In the Washington, D.C., area, unless programs get switched around, it'll appear at 2 p.m.

One of the charms of the show will be seeing my fading in and out of consciousness (almost); twice the judge had to get my attention. I hadn't slept the night before and was feeling the effects of Lipitor, which can cause insomnia and which showed my inability to take statins. What a way to debate, right? But as it turned out, I didn't have to. My opponent walked out during the taping, producers chasing her, all of which will appear before your very eyes on your screens!

Letters to your MUM

Companies do not add asbestos to tampons

I again received an e-mail claiming that manufacturers put asbestos in tampons to make women bleed more and give them cancer, etc.

[Dr. Philip Tierno, Jr., of the New York University Medical School and Director of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology at the NYU Medical Center, an authority on the safety of menstrual products and a member of the board of this museum, writes that companies do NOT put asbestos in tampons. Read his statement. Dr. Tierno has opposed the menstrual products companies in many lawsuits and his research is not financially supported by the industry.


How food influences menstruation

Hi,

I'm a graduate student in women's studies at Towson University in Maryland. In my reproductive technologies class we learned that although late menarche (one's first period) can be a result of malnutrition, as you mentioned on your Web site, it can also be a sign of low body fat and therefore of good health.

For instance, when agriculture became domesticated, we began eating fatter meat and grazing (which is exercise) less and getting our periods earlier and for more years. The more years of menstruation without interruptions (from childbearing, for instance, but also from contraceptives that lighten menstrual flows), the higher risk of reproductive cancers because of the constant surge of hormones. Many hunter-gatherer societies were/are not malnourished but have ample diets; they simply delay menstruation and have less regular menstruation because they nurse their babies on demand (whenever the child is hungry) and exercise every day when finding food.

Also, it is now possible to predict the age of one's menarche from one's body fat content at age 5. The higher the body fat, the longer span of years menstruating. [And last week a news item appeared, indicating that underweight babies have an earlier menarche, on the average.]

Melissa Ferguson,

Takoma Park, Maryland (U.S.A.)

Later she wrote:

Thanks for dedicating a whole museum to what seems sometimes to dominate my life yet at the same time is so hush-hush! Silly, ain't it?


Again, my Slovenian correspondent disputes premenstrual syndrome (PMS) (read her first letter, the second one below this one)

Hi, Harry,

I am shaken upon hearing about women who dislike their bodies and inherently detest menstruation. [Read some MUM visitors' feelings about this.] I consider it fun. To me the so-called PMS is extra energy and it is up to each individual how she uses it. Some choose to believe it a negative and painful thing. I have never experienced any kind of pain in connection with it whatsoever.

Looking forward to hearing from you again.

[Later in the week she wrote again, having seen my comment that many women must be lying]

I saw that comment!!! [See the letter below this one.]

I never said they are faking it. I think they perceive the sensations they have before and during menstruation as pain and many think menstruation is at best annoying and must be put up with. This is the way they were taught. Or just observed behavior of the other adults when they were little. Their subconscious just picks up the signs and their bodies dutifully play the part.

I also saw those ads in the humor section. I would just like to slap silly the people who write those things. Those kind of ads are a downright invitation to butt-kicking. They add a lot to the insecurities of young girls. They read them and they believe that menstruation is a messy, embarrassing, painful thing that should remain hidden. How fortunate that the benevolent companies are willing to SELL them those scented pads.

Based on my experience it goes a little like this:

"Hey, women. Our (hired by the company) scientists have done research that revealed that your bodies are defective. That after thousands of years of evolution you need our help. How fortunate for you that we are here to SELL you these great new still experimental pills. And how about that awful odor?! Do not let yourself get embarrassed! BUY our products today for only XY.99!"

Young impressionable minds fill in the blanks.

I have two jokes for you.

Drop me a line sometime!

[Her first letter:

[I have seen your site about menstruation. It contains a lot of useful information and humorous things. But what is it with PMS and cramps?!! Not to mention all the recipes for home-made medicine.

[There is no such thing as PMS and painful menstruation. You should not mislead the young girls in Western cultures like that.

[(my comments: The writer is from Slovenia, a country lying near Austria, Italy and Yugoslavia. An awful lot of women must be faking!]


Buy the book Moon Days, about menstruation

Just thought you'd like to let people know that the book Moon Days: Creative Writings about Menstruation is now distributed through Ash Tree Publishing, 1-800- 356-9315 [a phone number in the U.S.A.]. Thanks!

Cassie Premo Steele

Editor, Moon Days


 

MUM in medical directory

Thank you,

Your site has been approved and added to the med411 database. [Many thanks! But if you have a not up-to-date browser, you may crash because of Java when you visit the site]

http://www.med411.com/

[Elsewhere on that site we read,

Criteria for selection include:

* Content of interest to healthcare professionals

* Tone and presentation maintained at a professional level

* Site structure, navigation and graphic design executed at a professional level

* A high level of integrity and credibility]



Pap art exhibit starts 21 September in Delray Beach, Florida

I am writing to request your participation and assistance in an exciting and important project regarding women's health issues.

The world-renowned scientist and lover of the arts Dr. George Papanicolaou, better known as Dr. Pap, inventor of the Pap smear test, will be the subject of a special exhibition at the Cornell Museum of Art in Delray Beach, Florida, beginning September 21, 2000. The gala opening and artist's reception will be held on Thursday evening September 28, 2000. The foremost patient advocate and director of the Center For Cervical Health in the United States, Carol Ann Armenti, will be the keynote speaker.

The exhibition will run through November 12, 2000, and will feature recent works by international artist Olga Stamatiou, Dr. Papanicolaou's niece. Stamatiou's works will be available for acquisition and the profits will go toward:

1. The creation of "PAP MOBILES," vehicles that would be used to provide testing for under-served women in areas, with the highest incidence of cervical cancer.

2. The creation of a traveling multimedia art exhibition.

3. The production of a documentary film based on the life, work and scientific legacy of Dr. Papanicolaou and his wife Mary.

4. The Center for Cervical Health.

5. The Papanicolaou Woman's Corp.

Our organization "PAP" - Prevention and Protection - will have as its goal to raise awareness about women's health issues, including the importance of having regular Pap smears and the provision of information on new and existing methods for detecting cervical cancer.

The traveling exhibition, to be viewed in public spaces and museums, will be a multimedia environment drawing on and inspired by Dr. Pap's love of the arts and sciences. This environment will include permanent built-in units that will provide creative spaces for national and local women's health organizations to inform women on what is available involving health care.

The September 28th opening reception will also include international guest artists and feature a wide range of styles and media. A percentage of their work will benefit the above-mentioned projects.

Olympus Corporation of America will provide working microscopes and monitors along with technicians on opening night to demonstrate how Pap smears are read.



Washable-pad company for sale

Gayle Adams, owner of Feminine Options, wants to sell the company to someone willing to put time and energy into it. The Food and Drug Administration has already approved its products.

Call Gayle at (715) 455-1652 (Wisconsin, U.S.A.).

[See and read about washable pads.]



Money and this site

I, Harry Finley, creator of the museum and site and the "I" of the narrative here, receive no money for any products or services on this site. Sometimes people donate items to the museum.

All expenses for the site come out of my pocket, where my salary from my job as a graphic designer is deposited.


You have privacy here

What happens when you visit this site?

Nothing.

I get no information about you from any source when you visit, and I have no idea who you are, before, during or after your visit.

This is private - period.


Is this the new millennium or even century?

You can get the correct information if you go to these pages published by the U S Naval Observatory:

http://psyche.usno.navy.mil/millennium/whenIs.html (that`s a capital "i" in

"whenIs")

http://aa.usno.navy.mil/AA/faq/docs/millennium.html

A comprehensive site from the Royal Observatory, Greenwich will put right any doubts:

http://www.rog.nmm.ac.uk/leaflets/new_mill.html


Tell Your Congressperson You Support the Tampon Safety and Research Act of 1999! Here's How and Why


Help Wanted: This Museum Needs a Public Official For Its Board of Directors

Your MUM is doing the paper work necessary to become eligible to receive support from foundations as a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation. To achieve this status, it helps to have a American public official - an elected or appointed official of the government, federal, state or local - on its board of directors.

What public official out there will support a museum for the worldwide culture of women's health and menstruation?

Read about my ideas for the museum. What are yours?

Eventually I would also like to entice people experienced in the law, finances and fund raising to the board.

Any suggestions?


Do You Have Irregular Menses?

If so, you may have polycystic ovary syndrome [and here's a support association for it].

Jane Newman, Clinical Research Coordinator at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard University School of Medicine, asked me to tell you that

Irregular menses identify women at high risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which exists in 6-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is a major cause of infertility and is linked to diabetes.

Learn more about current research on PCOS at Brigham and Women's Hospital, the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania State University - or contact Jane Newman.

If you have fewer than six periods a year, you may be eligible to participate in the study!

See more medical and scientific information about menstruation.


New this week: Constipation relief at last, or . . . ?: Dr. Young's rectal dilators (U.S.A., 1900-1940?) - humor

Would you stop menstruating if you could? (New entries)
Words and expressions for menstruation (Two new entries, America: "Closed . . . " and "Visit . . .")
What did European and American women use for menstruation in the past?

PREVIOUS NEWS
first page | MUM address | contact the museum | privacy on this site | art of menstruation | artists (non-menstrual) | belts | bidets | Bly, Nellie | MUM board | books (and reviews) | cats | company booklets directory | costumes | cups | cup usage | dispensers | douches, pain, sprays | essay directory | extraction | famous people | FAQ | humor | huts | links | media | miscellaneous | museum future | Norwegian menstruation exhibit | odor | pad directory | patent medicine | poetry directory | products, current | religion | menstrual products safety | science | shame | sponges | synchrony | tampon directory | early tampons | teen ads directory | tour (video) | underpants directory | videos, films directory | What did women do about menstruation in the past? | washable pads

privacy on this site

2000 Harry Finley. It is illegal to reproduce or distribute work on this Web site in any manner or medium without written permission of the author. Please report suspected violations to hfinley@mum.org